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Object in Focus: Romanian Eggs at Bruton Museum

Jackie Brooks, Curator at the Bruton Museum, tells us how they hope an Object in Focus loan will welcome a new member of the community.

As part of the 'Object in Focus' loans scheme, Bruton Museum has borrowed a collection of Romanian decorated eggs. We are a small Somerset town museum dedicated to local history and although at first sight the eggs have no relationship to us they have begun to reach out and make connections.

Recently a big issue seller has appeared in town, and he happens to be a refugee from Romania. His parents left him on the streets of Bucharest when he was 14 leaving him to fend for himself. When Roxanna Gibescu came to give a talk about the egg decorating tradition we learnt that all the patterns on the eggs are symbolic. Abundance, family, and wealth are all represented in the symbols that adorn the eggs and we hope our Big Issue seller will find these things soon. 

Upstairs in our store was a wooden box with 5 trays of eggs collected in the Victorian era. The Horniman loan has prompted us to display them and they now sit alongside the loan in all their glorious variety.

  • Bruton Museum's collection of eggs, Jackie Brooks− © Bruton Museum
    , Jackie Brooks

The case with the eggs in is placed at the entrance to the museum and is always greeted with a 'wow'. We love having them here.

 

Object in Focus: Shogi at Southend Central Museum

Iona Farrell of the Southend Central Museum tells us how an Object in Focus loan helped inspire an exciting new exhibition. 

I’m Iona Farrell and I volunteer with Southend Central Museum and the Beecroft Art Gallery, which are based in Southend, a seaside town in Essex.

At Southend Central Museum we have been lucky enough to have an exquisite Japanese shogi board on loan from the Horniman. This is part of the Object in Focus series and will be on display until the 18th of October.

Shogi, for those who don’t know, and I must admit I was pretty clueless before the loan, is similar to chess. This is an exciting game of tactics and once pieces are captured a player can replay them as their own, which some say is like soldiers switching sides in battle.

This shogi set has carved pieces painted with Japanese characters that have been carefully positioned to mimic the start of a game - so visitors can use their imagination to guess how the game would play out.

The loan has taken pride of place in the museum, so visitors are captivated by this intriguing object as they enter. Southend Museum displays local and natural history collections alongside a rotating exhibitions programme, and it has been brilliant having such a special artefact amongst the displays.

This object in focus inspired us to look within the Museum's own collection to draw out the history of games and create an exciting new exhibition – Toys and Games.

  • Toys and Games exhibition at Southend Central Museum, Toys and Games exhibition at Southend Central Museum
    Toys and Games exhibition at Southend Central Museum

A fellow volunteer and I were lucky enough to curate this exhibition and we decided to transform the space into a fun place for both young and old to delight in the stories of toys. There are lots of recognisable classics, with train sets and board games alongside some more unusual treasures such as toy theatres and magic sets.

Visitors can trace the chronology of toys as they accompany us in early life from simple building blocks through to complex engineering sets as we age and develop. The museum has also hosted a special Fun and Games event for children where they discovered the history of toys and played Victorian parlour games.

Whilst researching for the exhibition we were surprised that many games have ancient origins. Senet, which is believed to be the first board game ever, was played in Ancient Egypt over six thousand years ago. Shogi, in its earliest form, dates back to the 10th century and the Horniman’s set is thought to date from the early 19th century.

  • Building Blocks at Southend Central Museum, Building Blocks at Southend Central Museum
    Building Blocks at Southend Central Museum

One of the oldest pieces in the exhibition is a 19th century set of wooden building blocks. Like the shogi set it is formed of carved pieces, but these are used for the rather more simple activity of building towers. In the 19th century, the idea of linking play with learning accelerated but it hadn’t been until the late 18th century that toys like this were even created specifically for children.

We hope people will continue to enjoy discovering all about this shogi set and have as much fun as I did learning all about the history of toys.

 

Object in Focus: Swedish Straw Goats at Haslemere Museum

Lindsay Moreton, Collections Manager at Haslemere Museum, tells us how the loan of five Swedish straw goats from the Horniman has helped their latest exhibition.

As part of our exhibition, ‘The Rustic Renaissance: Haslemere’s Arts and Crafts Heritage’ (on show until 2nd September 2017) Haslemere Museum has borrowed five Swedish straw goats through the Horniman Museum’s Object in Focus project. The exhibition tells the story of how a group of artists and artisans created an artistic enclave in Haslemere in the early 1900s. The exhibition features folk art objects from the European Peasant Art Collection, which were originally collected to inspire local craftspeople and to try to preserve declining traditional handicraft skills after the Industrial Revolution.

  • Swedish Straw Goats on display at Haslemere Museum, Swedish Straw Goats on display at Haslemere Museum
    Swedish Straw Goats on display at Haslemere Museum

We were thrilled that the straw goats or ‘julbock’ were available for loan to coincide with our exhibition as they are the perfect example of a traditional folk art from Sweden. Many objects in our ‘Peasant Art’ Collection originate from the country too. Our visitors have loved seeing these charming objects and a local Swedish resident who lives opposite the Museum has displayed her own straw goat in her window in honour of their arrival! 

The Object in Focus project is a great way for regional museums like us to borrow interesting artefacts from the Horniman and the whole process has been smoothly managed by Sarah and the team at the Museum. We will be sad to see the friendly goats go when we return them in September!

 

The Badger at Burgh House

Hello, I’m Becky Lodge the Curator at Burgh House, an historic house with a local history museum, based in Hampstead.

We borrowed the Object in Focus taxidermy badger from the Horniman last year and the staff all became very fond of her. We have no natural history specimens in our own collection, and the badger is super cute.

The badger featured in an exhibition of picture postcards of Hampstead called Hello from Hampstead! Discovering a History through Postcards.

Hampstead is a suburb of London that has been a popular visitor destination for centuries, especially for its vast and famous Heath. Not only is the Heath an incredible place to explore, it is host to a wonderful variety of plants and animals.

The badger helped us to show this, complementing our postcards beautifully.

Working with Sarah and the conservators from the Horniman on the loan was a really enjoyable experience. The whole process was so well managed, it was a delight for our small team. Thanks, Horniman Museum and Gardens!

Find out more about our Object in Focus loans project.

Discover more from Burgh House on their website or connect with them on Facebook and Twitter.

Cleaning a Persian Dhal

Conservator Charlotte talks to us today about cleaning a steel Persian Dhal to discover its intricately detailed decoration. 

This steel Persian Dhal (shield) is one of a number of objects to go on loan to Bucks County Museum as part of their “Art of Islam” Exhibition.

At some point in its history this shield had been covered in shellac lacquer that had, over time, discoloured and trapped dirt against the surface. The lacquer had also been applied over tarnished metal and both these issues were obscuring the fine engravings and gilt layer across the surface of the shield.  

  • Persian Dhal shield, The front of shield before treatment.
    The front of shield before treatment.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The back of the shield before treatment â the detaching cotton textile can be seen at the top left of the shield.
    The back of the shield before treatment â the detaching cotton textile can be seen at the top left of the shield.

We removed the old lacquer layer with solvents. This process had the added benefit of removing some of the corrosion product across the surface of the metal. We then applied museum-grade abrasion paste to remove the thicker areas of corrosion.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.
    The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.

To protect the metal, we hot waxed the shield with microcrystalline wax. This technique involves carefully heating the metal and applying wax to the surface, which is then left to cool. Using a lint-free cloth we then rigorously buffed the metal to remove excess wax and create an even shine. 

The cotton textile on the back of the shield was detaching from the metal and had to be secured back down. To do this, we aheared small tabs of Japanese tissue between the textile and the metal to act as an “anchor” and to allow for easier treatment reversibility.

We then inserted thermoplastic adhesive, applied as a “dry film”, between the Japanese tissue and the metal and then heat activated to bond the two materials together. A “wet” adhesive was then applied on top of the tissue, with the textile pressed down on to the adhesive and clamped in place, while the adhesive dried. This technique was repeated around the edge of the shield until the textile was secured in place.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.
    The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.
    The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.
    The gilt layers became visible during cleaning and corrosion removal.

  • Persian Dhal shield, The back of the shield after treatment. The cotton textile is now secure against the metal.
    The back of the shield after treatment. The cotton textile is now secure against the metal.

The resulting clean and corrosion removal allows us to see more intricate detail and securing the textile on the back of the shield should hopefully prevent any further damage to this material.

The Art of Islam

Objects from the Horniman's collection are on display now in a new major exhibition at Bucks County Museum in Aylesbury.

The exhibition, running from March 26 until September 24 2016, is part of the Art of Islam Festival and reflects Islamic culture and its links with Western Europe, 

Treasures on display will include carpets, paintings, furniture, metalwork, jewellery and splendid calligraphy from across the Middle East.

Among the objects from the Horniman's collection are this ewer, seal and baby cover.

 

This Bidri ware ewer is from India and dates from the late 19th century, when it was sold to Frederick Horniman.

 

This seal, dating from 1776, is engraved in Persian with a floral border. It belonged to James Peter Auriol of the Bengal civil service, who was secretary to the government of Warren Hastings in India in the late 18th century.

This cover from Sumatra is placed on the forehead of a baby (along with another cover for the baby's body) when visitors come to see it during the first forty days of life.

In addition to the Horniman's collection, exhibits will also be borrowed from the British Museum, Birmingham City Museum and Art Gallery and from the private collection of Razwan and Sarya Baig.

The Horniman and Pepys

The Horniman has loaned three musical instruments to a major new exhibition celebrating the life and times of Samuel Pepys at the National Maritime Museum.

Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution has brought together a wealth of paintings, manuscripts and artefacts to explore the period from the execution of King Charles I in 1649 to the Glorious Revolution in 1688.

They are exploring a formative era which saw the repositioning of the monarchy and the consolidation of Britain’s place as a maritime, economic and political force on the world stage. It coincides with the 400th anniversary of the Queen’s House, one of London’s most important buildings sitting at the heart of Stuart Greenwich and now the Royal Museums Greenwich.



The exhibition uses the voice and experiences of Pepys, one of the most colourful and appealing personalities of the age. Pepys is well known as a passionate diarist and prolific correspondent, but the exhibition also looks at his character as a master naval administrator, a well-connected socialite, gossip, and lover of music, theatre and fine living.

Music is very important to his story as one of his abiding passions – he played, composed and was an amateur teacher. He is known to have played the played the flageolet, guitar and lute – the three artefacts we have loaned to the exhibition. The Horniman’s instruments play an important role illustrating the types of instruments from this period he may have played.

Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution is on at the National Maritime Museum until the 28th March 2016.

West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song

The British Library has put together a new exhibition on the power of the word – written, spoken and sung – in West Africa, and the Horniman has contributed by lending items from both the Anthropology and Musical Instruments collections.

The exhibition opened to coincide with Black History month earlier this year, and is exploring a range of fascinating stories from the region’s 17 nations. Focusing on West African history, life and culture over the last three centuries, it covers from the great African empires of the Middle Ages to the cultural dynamism of West Africa today.

Using a range of collections they have looked at text, story and writing and how words can be used to build and change societies, to challenge and resist, and sustain life and dignity. The exhibition highlights the rich manuscript heritage of West Africa and the coming of printing, as well as oral genres, past and modern.

The Horniman has loaned a talking drum and lamellaphone from our Musical Instruments collection and a Bwa plank mask, Gelede mask and divination board from our Anthropology collection to help bring the printed and written works to life.

West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song is on at the British Library until Tue 16 Feb 2016

Horniman soil at the Tate

I was contacted in the summer by the Project Manager of this year’s Turbine Hall installation at Tate Modern - who lives in Forest Hill.  He explained the basic premise of obtaining soil samples across London and seeing what grows from them.  It all sounded very interesting and the Horniman Gardens team were really keen on helping out.

 

We have over 16 acres of gardens, perfect for soil harvesting

Empty Lot features a grid of 240 wooden planters filled with compost and over 23 tonnes of soil collected from parks and gardens all across London from Peckham Rye to Regent’s Park, and of course the Horniman Gardens. 

By the end of the summer we had supplied over two tonnes of the Horniman’s finest soil.  Spread across the site it was easy to supply that quantity without leaving gaping holes in our shrub borders. In September the artist Abraham Cruzvillegas visited the Horniman Gardens to see first-hand where the soil came from.  It was great to meet him and get more of an idea of what he was planning.

 

Our celebrity soil being used by seedlings in our nursery

Last night (12.10.15.) members of the Horniman Gardens team were invited to the opening at the Tate and were blown away by the installation, which fills almost all of the Hall.  The first seedlings could already be seen germinating and it will be fascinating to see what grows over the next few months - growing conditions have been artificially created using grow lights and hand watering the soil.

 

Sacks of Horniman soil packed up for the exhibition

Despite a few aching backs in the team from bagging up over two tonnes of soil it has been great to contribute to such an iconic art installation at Tate Modern.

 

For more information on the exhibition click here

Horniman collections on display at Tate Britain

Five objects from the Horniman's acclaimed Anthropology collection are currently on display at Tate Britain, as part of the exhibition British Folk Art.

We asked curator Martin Myrone to introduce the exhibition and tell us why our objects are on display.

British Folk Art brings together inventive, strange and wonderful objects from collections across the country, made by people outside the artistic mainstream.

Displaced from their contexts in social history or regional collections, they are being shown as examples of everyday, sometimes idiosyncratic, creativity.

These are objects with multiple lives - as functional objects, decoration, cherished artworks or historical curiosities.

  • British Folk Art at Tate Britain., The object second from right on bottom row is an apothecary trade sign from the Horniman's collections.
    The object second from right on bottom row is an apothecary trade sign from the Horniman's collections.


The objects being borrowed from the Horniman are wonderful examples of the invention applied to the craft of creating trade signs in the past.

  • Boot-shaped trade sign, On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain
    On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain

  • Underside of boot trade sign, On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain
    On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain

  • Tobacconist Sign, On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain
    On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain

The strange and brooding Chimneysweep's Sign, for example, is both a fantastic piece of figurative sculpture, and a rather alien, even 'ethnographic' artefact.

  • Chimney Sweep Trade Sign, On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain
    On display in British Folk Art at Tate Britain

What was once an everyday piece of street signage has been transformed by time and by re-display into a compelling artwork.

British Folk Art is at Tate Britain until 31 August 2014. Later this year, the exhibition will be at Compton Verney from 27 September to 14 December.

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