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#TranscribeTuesday at the Horniman

Today marks the start of #TranscribeTuesday in our archive, as we invite the public to become Horniman historians and deceipher the handwritten notes of curators and collectors past.

Normally hidden in our archive stores, 'Scrapbooks G & H' provide a fascinating record of the Horniman's early purchases, including some of the most iconic objects from the collection.

These records are over 100 years old, and show objects signed over to the Horniman's first curator, Richard Quick, and even to the museum's founder Frederick Horniman himself.

Many contain their own notes about their purchases, often including quick sketches, presumably to remind themselves of which object was which before the days of quick and easy photography.

Now, each page of these fascinating folios has been carefully digitised, but there is still some information missing from our collections database.

Inspired by St Fagans National History Museum in Wales, we're uploading these documents to the photo-sharing website Flickr, and inviting the public to transcribe the handwritten notes in the comments. We're hoping this information can then be added to our database to help researchers in the future.

To get involved and add your transcriptions (there might be more than one interpretation of some particularly spidery scrawls), head on over to our #TranscribeTuesday Flickr set and sign in to get started. If you don't already have a Flickr account, creating one is free and easy.

We've started the project by uploading receipts from the first page of Scrapbook G.

Transcription can be a tricky task: while the text of some receipts seems easy to read, the handwriting of some sellers seems deliberately designed to stump.

You don't need to transcribe a whole document at once (although we are looking for a transcription for every piece of text on each receipt). If a letter of word is completely unreadable, typing [?] or [000] in your description is a good way to show it.

If you fancy doing a little work to hone your transcription skills first, why not check out The National Archives interactive tutorial? You can try your hand at some really tricky passages and check how accurate your reading was at the end.

Alternatively, if you don't fancy your deceiphering skills, just taking a look at some of the receipts now on display online allows a fascinating glimpse into museum purchases of the past.

We'll be sharing further pages from the scrapbook on Twitter every Tuesday, as well as tweeting some transcription tips, so be sure to look out for the #TranscribeTuesday hashtag. Other organisations are also making use of the tag, so take a look and see where else you can get involved.